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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 8:45pm EST
matters most in life that emerged within a clinton text in the early 1520s, have never gone away. instead, they have been transformed, they've been modified, they've been expanded, in terms of content and character, even as efforts have been made to contain some manage their unintended and enormous effects. the most important institutional facilitators of the process have been, and remain, modern liberal states. which solve the problems of early modern confessional coexistence. as i note in the introduction of the book the unintended reformation expands upon and develops conclusions that i reached at the end of my first book, salvation at stake, christian martyr dom insuring case you want to read another book of mine after this one. it was already clear to me then that critical aspects of the era can be seen if modern christianity is studied comparatively, across confessional boundaries, incorporating state-pouter it protestantses, and catholics. it would be an exaggeration, wrote, in the conclusion of salvation at stake to say that unresolved religious disagreement caused the en
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2013 10:00pm EST
, kissinger, a william f. buckley, jr., the clinton, al gore gorby doll, jacqueline kennedy and naturally with his interest of american history sammy davis, jr., a and mick jagger. [laughter] to a detractor to accused arthur of being a communist sympathizer he said your first letter was a product of misunderstanding for you to really provide if not i can only send you to the nearest psychiatrist. but i should note arthur had a keen appreciation for andrew jackson and jack daniel's. as is also appreciated arthur did not believe white wine was done to the day given the difficulties of the afternoon. he is the author of terror across and teeeighteen that co-editor of his father's struggle. his films won two emmys serving as the world director of the policy is to share am publisher of the journal of a speech writer and foreign policy adviser for'' well also the author of factive creation that received the harry s. truman book award. our friend tom brokaw will play a key role in this discussion in the future of liberalism. his career of one of the great american and light weight gret
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 8:00am EST
democratic candidates starting with adelaide stevenson and john f. kennedy and people, bill clinton, walter mondale, i can list practically every presidential candidate on the democratic ticket for those 60 years, they all turned to him because they realized he was kind of serving as a kind of liberal conscience to that generation of political people. and the a way they needed -- in a way they needed his validation to be able to appeal to the liberal constituency that he tended to represent. >> but a hard-headed kind of liberalism. >> that's right. >> which is where -- he was so close to stevenson and did not make the transition to kennedy overnight. could you talk about that transition to shift from libertyville to hyannis? >> well, that's very interesting because you used the word hardheaded. he was very disappointed -- he, obviously, adored stevenson, e worked for him twice. but be at the same time, he felt that stevenson seemed rather passive on the issue of civil rights. and he was very, as tom points out, he had woken to that issue from having that visit in the mid 1940s to th
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 7:00am EST
, both president clinton and bobby kennedy, much better than the joint chiefs and many of the advisors. they were pragmatic, cared about politics but argue for military restraint where both the joint chiefs, people like bundy and mcnamara all state under johnson really tarnished the reputation by their performance in vietnam. why was kennedy better than his advisers sequence well, -- it's not working. i think kennedy understood he was the responsible party. and he was deeply troubled by the fact that -- and what people have forgotten, i still teach, i'm in washington and in beijing people 20 years old, they don't have a clue at this point as to how frightened and concerned people were in the '50s and 60s about the possibility, indeed, even the likelihood that there could be a nuclear war. kennedy at one point said to somebody in private, i'd rather my kids be red than dead. he never could've said that in public. but what worried him so much was the fact that the chiefs when he came into office, that local commanders in the field, if there were an incident with the soviets, that they co
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 7:00pm EST
clinton. they're both in some sense on the same side. people who were displeased with both of them wanted to see them as adversaries and in certain senses they were. so it's complicated and ongoing, and i think it is in every culture, bill the way. i think that -- it's certainly part of our legacy but citizenship is constantly -- france, other places, constantsly being reinvestigated. sorry to go on. thank you. >> could you discuss the role or lack thereof, among political opponents of compromise during the times you looked at, and how it relates to today, to political factions you see compromised equivalent to treason. >> i think that's for you. the subtitle of my book is "confidence, crisis and compromise." and one of the white motifs, one of the themes that goes through the book, is the issue of compromise, because not only do we hear about the compromise of 1820, 1850, but the actual word was constantly being ban died about and you have people shouting in the senate, or in the house of representatives, i will not compromise. or william lloyd garrison saying no compromise with s
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5